Calorie count clear on wine labels, exports shake. And only the hypothesis that an end to the waivered norm for wine makes producers of Amarone and other Italian wines with high alcohol content tremble

22/12/2015

To date there is no obligation to indicate the amount of calories on the label for wine, but the EU Commission, even with being at least a year behind schedule with respect to other foods and drinks brought to norm in December 2014, is working on the question of the nutritional facts on labels. And only the hypothesis that an end to the waivered norm for wine makes producers of Amarone and other Italian wines with high alcohol content, and therefore higher calories, tremble.

Denis Pantini, director of Wine Monitor for Nomisma, spoke about this on a side note during Wine2Wine. “Just think that on Google,” underlined Pantini, “interest in searches with the words ‘calories’ and ‘wine’ see the United States (100) in first place, followed by the United Kingdom (66), Canada (63), Australia (50), and France (25): all markets with a strong interest in export wine made in Italy.”

An adult who weighs about 70kg requires about 2,170 calories a day. A bottle of Amarone, whose alcohol content is 16%, contains 885 calories, equal to about 134 calories per 150ml glass. A lighter wine, at 13%, gives about 109 calories per glass winning out by about 20%.

For male and female consumers who watch their figure, finding a calorie warning on the label of Bacchus’ nectar can be a strong deterrent against drinking even a simple wine during a meal,” observed Pantini.

The introduction of the obligation to include nutritional facts on wine labels, “would be another disaster,” commented Domenico Zonin, President of Italian Union of Wines, “especially for small producers whose labels are the only way to communicate. In general, it would be communicating that takes away from the tradition of moderate consumption for which we are the top spokespeople. Furthermore, for the wine world, it would be an inappropriate certification at the risk of unhealthy food which we do not identify with. Our culture of moderate drinking cannot be tossed aside by wrong policy choices.”




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